Commit ae9b78d9 authored by Yunsup Lee's avatar Yunsup Lee
Browse files

add what/how explanation to README

parent 5f55ded7
......@@ -4,36 +4,35 @@ Rocket Chip Generator
This repository contains the Rocket chip generator necessary to instantiate
the RISC-V Rocket Core.
## Table of Contents
Contributors
------------
+ [Quick instructions](#quick) for those who want to dive directly into the details without knowing exactly what's in the repository.
+ [What's in the Rocket chip generator repository?](#what)
+ [How should I use the Rocket chip generator?](#how)
+ [Using the high-performance cycle-accurate C++ emulator](#emulator)
+ [Mapping a Rocket core down to an FPGA](#fpga)
+ [Pushing a Rocket core through the VLSI tools](#vlsi)
+ [How can I parameterize my Rocket chip?](#param)
+ [Contributors](#contributors)
- Scott Beamer
- Henry Cook
- Yunsup Lee
- Stephen Twigg
- Huy Vo
- Andrew Waterman
Checkout The Code
-----------------
## <a name="quick"></a> Quick Instructions
$ git submodule update --init --recursive
### Checkout The Code
$ git submodule update --init
$ git submodule update --init riscv-tools/riscv-tests
Building The Toolchain
----------------------
### Setting up the RISCV environment variable
To build RISC-V ISA simulator, frontend server, proxy kernel and newlib based GNU toolchain:
To build the rocket-chip repository, you must point the RISCV
environment variable to your riscv-tools installation directory. If you
do not yet have riscv-tools installed, please follow the directions in
the
[riscv-tools/README](https://github.com/ucb-bar/riscv-tools/blob/master/README.md).
$ export RISCV=/path/to/riscv/toolchain/installation
$ cd riscv-tools
$ ./build.sh
Building The Project
--------------------
### Building The Project
To build the C simulator:
......@@ -45,10 +44,11 @@ To build the VCS simulator:
$ cd vsim
$ make
in either case, you can run a set of assembly tests or simple benchmarks:
In either case, you can run a set of assembly tests or simple benchmarks
(Assuming you have N cores on your host system):
$ make run-asm-tests
$ make run-bmarks-test
$ make -jN run-asm-tests
$ make -jN run-bmarks-test
To build a C simulator that is capable of VCD waveform generation:
......@@ -57,20 +57,369 @@ To build a C simulator that is capable of VCD waveform generation:
And to run the assembly tests on the C simulator and generate waveforms:
$ make run-asm-tests-debug
$ make run-bmarks-test-debug
$ make -jN run-asm-tests-debug
$ make -jN run-bmarks-test-debug
To get FPGA-synthesizable verilog (output will be in `fsim/generated-src`):
To generate FPGA-synthesizable verilog (output will be in `fsim/generated-src`):
$ cd fsim
$ make verilog
Similarly, to generate VLSI-synthesizable verilog (output will be in `vsim/generated-src`):
Updating To A Newer Version Of Chisel
-------------------------------------
$ cd vsim
$ make verilog
### Updating To A Newer Version Of Chisel
To grab a newer version of chisel:
$ git submodule update --init
$ cd chisel
$ git pull origin master
## <a name="what"></a> What's in the Rocket chip generator repository?
The rocket-chip repository is the head git repository that points to
many sub-repositories (e.g. the riscv-tools repository) using [git
submodules](http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Tools-Submodules). While
we're aware of the ongoing debate as to how meta-projects should be
managed (i.e. a big monolithic repository vs. smaller repositories
tracked as submodules), we've found that for our chip-building projects
at Berkeley, the ability to compose a subset of private and public
sub-repositories on a per-chip basis is a killer feature of git
submodule.
So, which submodules are actually included in this chip's repository?
Here's a look at all the git submodules that are currently tracked in
the rocket-chip repository:
* **chisel**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/chisel](https://github.com/ucb-bar/chisel)):
At Berkeley, we write RTL in Chisel. For those whom are not familiar
with Chisel, please go take a look at
[http://chisel.eecs.berkeley.edu](http://chisel.eecs.berkeley.edu). We
have submoduled a specific git commit tag of the Chisel compiler rather
than pointing to a versioned Chisel release as an external dependency;
so far we were developing Chisel and the rocket core at the same time,
and hence it was easiest to use submodule to track bleeding edge commits
to Chisel, which contained a bunch of new features and bug fixes. As
Chisel gets more stable, we will likely replace this submodule with an
external dependency.
* **rocket**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/rocket](https://github.com/ucb-bar/rocket)):
The rocket repository holds the actual source code of the Rocket core.
Note that the L1 blocking I$ and the L1 non-blocking D$ are considered
part of the core, and hence we keep the L1 cache source code in this
repository. This repository is not meant to stand alone; it needs to be
included in a chip repository (e.g. rocket-chip) that instantiates the
core within a memory system and connects it to the outside world.
* **uncore**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/uncore](https://github.com/ucb-bar/uncore)):
This repository implements the uncore logic, such as the coherence hub
(the agent that keeps multiple L1 D$ coherent). The definition of the
coherent interfaces between tiles ("tilelink") and the interface to the
host machine ("htif") also live in this repository.
* **hardfloat**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/berkeley-hardfloat](https://github.com/ucb-bar/berkeley-hardfloat)):
This repository holds the parameterized IEEE 754-2008 compliant
floating-point units for fused multiply-add operations, conversions
between integer and floating-point numbers, and conversions between
floating-point conversions with different precision. The floating-point
units in this repository work on an internal recoded format (exponent
has an additional bit) to handle subnormal numbers more efficiently in
the processor. Please take a look at the
[README](https://github.com/ucb-bar/berkeley-hardfloat/blob/master/README.md)
in the repository for more information.
* **dramsim2**
([https://github.com/dramninjasUMD/DRAMSim2](https://github.com/dramninjasUMD/DRAMSim2)):
Currently, the DRAM memory system is implemented in the testbench. We
use dramsim2 to emulate DRAM timing.
* **fpga-zynq**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/fpga-zynq](https://github.com/ucb-bar/fpga-zynq)):
We also tag a version of the FPGA infrastructure that works with the RTL
committed in the rocket-chip repository.
* **riscv-tools**
([https://github.com/ucb-bar/riscv-tools](https://github.com/ucb-bar/riscv-tools)):
We tag a version of riscv-tools that works with the RTL committed in the
rocket-chip repository. Once the software toolchain stabilizes, we
might turn this submodule into an external dependency.
Next, take a look at rocket-chip's src/main/scala directory. There are a
couple Chisel source files including RocketChip.scala, which
instantiates both a Rocket core and the uncore logic, and then glues
them together. Here's a brief overview of source files found in the
rocket-chip repository:
* **RocketChip.scala**: Top-level source file (Top is the top-level
module name), which instantiates a Rocket core, uncore logic, and glues
them together.
* **Network.scala**: This source file holds the crossbar network used in
the uncore for multi-core implementations.
* **PublicConfigs.scala**: This holds all the rocket-chip parameters.
Probably this file is the most important file for external users. We
will revisit this topic in the next section "How should I use the Rocket
chip generator?", and will also post a more detailed explanation of the
parameter infrastructure in the near future.
* **Backends.scala**: An example of how the Chisel compiler's VLSI
backend can be extended to route a pin named "init" to all SRAM blocks
used in the design. This separation cleans up the source RTL of the
design, since we don't need to add all the vendor-specific stuff in the
Chisel source code, yet still can correctly hook up our particular
SRAMs. The transformation is just a "compiler pass" in the Chisel
backend that happens as the compiler translates the Chisel source code
down to Verilog. Pretty neat huh?
* **Vlsi.scala**: This file is pretty specific to our tapeouts. It
implements logic to interface with an arbitrary number of slow
single-ended digital I/Os when implementing a test chip.
Now you should take a look at the top-level I/O pins. Open up
src/main/scala/RocketChip.scala, and search for TopIO. You will read the
following (note, HostIO is defined in uncore/src/main/scala/htif.scala,
and MemIO is defined in uncore/src/main/scala/memserdes.scala):
class TopIO extends Bundle {
val host = new HostIO
val mem = new MemIO
val mem_backup_en = Bool(INPUT)
val in_mem_ready = Bool(OUTPUT)
val in_mem_valid = Bool(INPUT)
val out_mem_ready = Bool(INPUT)
val out_mem_valid = Bool(OUTPUT)
}
There are 3 major I/O ports coming out of the top-level module:
* **Host-target interface (HostIO)**: The host system talks to the
target machine via this host-target interface. We serialize a simple
protocol over this parameterized interface. More details will come.
* **High-performance memory interface (MemIO, mem\_backup\_en=false)**:
When mem\_backup\_en is tied low, all memory requests from the processor
comes out the MemIO port. The MemIO port uses the same uncore clock, and
is intended to be connected to something on the same chip.
* **Low-performance memory interface (parts of HostIO, in\_mem\_\*,
out\_mem\_\*, mem\_backup\_en=true)**: When mem\_backup\_en is tied
high, all memory requests from the processor comes out the
low-performance memory interface. To save actual pins on a test chip, we
multiplex the data pins of the host-target interface with the serialized
low-performance memory port. That's the reason why you only see the
control pins (in\_mem\_* and out\_mem\_*).
Of course, there's a lot more in the actual submodules, but hopefully
this would be enough to get you started with using the Rocket chip
generator. We will keep documenting more about our designs in the
respective README of each submodules, release notes, and even blog
posts. In the mean time, please post questions to the hw-dev mailing
list.
## <a name="how"></a> How should I use the Rocket chip generator?
Chisel can generate code for three targets: a high-performance
cycle-accurate C++ emulator, Verilog optimized for FPGAs, and Verilog
for VLSI. The Rocket chip generator can target all three backends. You
will need a Java runtime installed on your machine, since Chisel is
overlaid on top of [Scala](http://www.scala-lang.org/). Chisel RTL (i.e.
rocket-chip source code) is a Scala program executing on top of your
Java runtime. To begin, ensure that the ROCKETCHIP environment variable
points to the rocket-chip repository.
$ git clone https://github.com/ucb-bar/rocket-chip.git
$ cd rocket-chip
$ git submodule update --init
$ git submodule update --init riscv-tools/riscv-tests
$ export ROCKETCHIP=`pwd`
Before going any further, you must point the RISCV environment variable
to your riscv-tools installation directory. If you do not yet have
riscv-tools installed, follow the directions in the
[riscv-tools/README](https://github.com/ucb-bar/riscv-tools/blob/master/README.md).
export RISCV=/path/to/install/riscv/toolchain
Otherwise, you will see the following error message while executing any
command in the rocket-chip generator:
*** Please set environment variable RISCV. Please take a look at README.
### <a name="emulator"></a> 1) Using the high-performance cycle-accurate C++ emulator
Your next step is to get the C++ emulator working. Assuming you have N
cores on your host system, do the following:
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/emulator
$ make -jN run
By doing so, the build system will generate C++ code for the
cycle-accurate emulator, compile the emulator, compile all RISC-V
assembly tests and benchmarks, and run both tests and benchmarks on the
emulator. If make finished without any errors, it means that the
generated Rocket chip has passed all assembly tests and benchmarks!
Now take a look in the emulator/generated-src directory. You will find
Chisel generated C++ code.
$ ls $ROCKETCHIP/emulator/generated-src
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-0.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-0.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-1.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-1.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-2.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-2.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-3.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-3.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-4.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-4.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-5.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig-5.o
Top.DefaultCPPConfig.cpp
Top.DefaultCPPConfig.h
emulator.h
emulator_api.h
emulator_mod.h
Also, output of the executed assembly tests and benchmarks can be found
at emulator/output/\*.out. Each file has a cycle-by-cycle dump of
write-back stage of the pipeline. Here's an excerpt of
emulator/output/rv64ui-p-add.out:
C0: 483 [1] pc=[00000002138] W[r 3=000000007fff7fff][1] R[r 1=000000007fffffff] R[r 2=ffffffffffff8000] inst=[002081b3] add s1, ra, s0
C0: 484 [1] pc=[0000000213c] W[r29=000000007fff8000][1] R[r31=ffffffff80007ffe] R[r31=0000000000000005] inst=[7fff8eb7] lui t3, 0x7fff8
C0: 485 [0] pc=[00000002140] W[r 0=0000000000000000][0] R[r 0=0000000000000000] R[r 0=0000000000000000] inst=[00000000] unknown
This means at cycle 483, core 0, the first [1] shows that there's a
valid instruction at PC 0x2138 in the writeback stage, which is
0x002081b3 (add s1, ra, s0). The second [1] tells us that the register
file is writing r3 with the corresponding value 0x7fff7fff. When the add
instruction was in the decode stage, the pipeline had read r1 and r2
with the corresponding values next to it. Similarly at cycle 484,
there's a valid instruction (lui instruction) at PC 0x213c in the
writeback stage. At cycle 485, there isn't a valid instruction in the
writeback stage, perhaps, because of a instruction cache miss at PC
0x2140.
### <a name="fpga"></a> 2) Mapping a Rocket core down to an FPGA
We use Synopsys VCS for Verilog simulation. We acknowledge that using a
proprietary Verilog simulation tool for an open-source project is not
ideal; we ask the community to help us move DirectC routines (VCS's way
of gluing Verilog testbenches to arbitrary C/C++ code) into DPI/VPI
routines so that we can make Verilog simulation work with a open-source
Verilog simulator. In the meantime, you can use the C++ emulator to
generate vcd waveforms, which you can view with an open-source waveform
viewer such as GTKWave.
So assuming you have a working Rocket chip, you can generate Verilog for
the FPGA tools with the following commands:
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/fsim
$ make verilog
The Verilog used for the FPGA tools will be generated in
fsim/generated-src. Please proceed further with the directions shown in
the [README](https://github.com/ucb-bar/fpga-zynq/blob/master/README.md)
of the fpga-zynq repository.
However, if you have access to VCS, you will be able to run assembly
tests and benchmarks with the following commands (again assuming you
have N cores on your host machine):
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/fsim
$ make -jN run
The generated output looks similar to those generated from the emulator.
Look into fsim/output/\*.out for the output of the executed assembly
tests and benchmarks.
### <a name="vlsi"></a> 3) Pushing a Rocket core through the VLSI tools
You can generate Verilog for your VLSI flow with the following commands:
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/vsim
$ make verilog
Now take a look at vsim/generated-src, and the contents of the
Top.DefaultVLSIConfig.conf file:
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/vsim/generated-src
Top.DefaultVLSIConfig.conf
Top.DefaultVLSIConfig.prm
Top.DefaultVLSIConfig.v
consts.DefaultVLSIConfig.vh
memdessertMemDessert.DefaultVLSIConfig.v
$ cat $ROCKETCHIP/vsim/generated-src/*.conf
name MetadataArray_tag_arr depth 128 width 84 ports mwrite,read mask_gran 21
name ICache_tag_array depth 128 width 38 ports mrw mask_gran 19
name DataArray_T6 depth 512 width 128 ports mwrite,read mask_gran 64
name HellaFlowQueue_ram depth 32 width 133 ports write,read
name ICache_T157 depth 512 width 128 ports rw
The conf file contains information for all SRAMs instantiated in the
flow. If you take a close look at the $ROCKETCHIP/Makefrag, you will see
that during Verilog generation, the build system calls a $(mem\_gen)
script with the generated configuration file as an argument, which will
fill in the Verilog for the SRAMs. Currently, the $(mem\_gen) script
points to vsim/vlsi\_mem\_gen, which simply instantiates behavioral
SRAMs. You will see those SRAMs being appended at the end of
vsim/generated-src/Top.DefaultVLSIConfig.v. To target vendor-specific
SRAMs, you will need to make necessary changes to vsim/vlsi\_mem\_gen.
Similarly, if you have access to VCS, you can run assembly tests and
benchmarks with the following commands (again assuming you have N cores
on your host machine):
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/vsim
$ make -jN run
The generated output looks similar to those generated from the emulator.
Look into vsim/output/\*.out for the output of the executed assembly
tests and benchmarks.
## <a name="param"></a> How can I parameterize my Rocket chip?
By now, you probably figured out that all generated files have a
configuration name attached, e.g. DefaultCPPConfig and
DefaultVLSIConfig. Take a look at src/main/scala/PublicConfigs.scala.
Search for NSets and NWays defined in DefaultConfig. You can change
those numbers to get a Rocket core with different cache parameters. For
example, by changing L1I, NWays to 4, you will get a 32KB 4-way
set-associative L1 instruction cache rather than a 16KB 2-way
set-associative L1 instruction cache. By searching further for
DefaultVLSIConfig and DefaultCPPConfig, you will see that currently both
are set to be identical to DefaultConfig.
Further down, you will be able to see two FPGA configurations:
FPGAConfig and FPGASmallConfig. FPGAConfig inherits from DefaultConfig,
but overrides the low-performance memory port (i.e., backup memory port)
to be turned off. This is because the high-performance memory port is
directly connected to the high-performance AXI interface on the ZYNQ
FPGA. FPGASmallConfig inherits from FPGAConfig, but changes the cache
sizes, disables the FPU, turns off the fast early-out multiplier and
divider, and reduces the number of TLB entries. This small configuration
is used for the Zybo FPGA board, which has the smallest ZYNQ part.
Now take a look at fsim/Makefile and vsim/Makefile. Search for the
CONFIG variable. DefaultFPGAConfig is used for the FPGA build, while
DefaultVLSIConfig is used for the VLSI build. You can also change the
CONFIG variable on the make command line:
$ cd $ROCKETCHIP/vsim
$ make -jN CONFIG=DefaultFPGAConfig run
Or, even by defining CONFIG as an environment variable:
$ export CONFIG=DefaultFPGAConfig
$ make -jN run
This parameterization is one of the many strengths of processor
generators written in Chisel, and will be more detailed in a future blog
post, so please stay tuned.
## <a name="contributors"></a> Contributors
- Scott Beamer
- Henry Cook
- Yunsup Lee
- Stephen Twigg
- Huy Vo
- Andrew Waterman
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